Sunday, 23 August 2015

Easy Eyelet Infinity Cowl

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For the last few years I've tended to crochet more than knit, but this long, tedious Melbourne Winter has seen me get out the knitting needles of an evening rather than my usual crochet hook.

This project was helped along enormously by the generous folk at Lincraft who very kindly sent us some Montego Yarn to play with.  The colourway is Rose and while the 100% wool 8ply yarn is normally knitted with size 4mm needles, I went for something a little chunkier for this project.








You will need:

Size 9mm knitting needles
3 balls Lincraft Montego 8ply yarn





Pattern

Using 9mm needles cast on 31 stitches.

Rows 1 and 5(right side):   Knit
Row 2 and all wrong side rows:  Purl
Row 3:  Knit 1, *k2tog, yo, k2:  repeat from *, end k2
Row 7:  Knit 1, *k2, ssk, yo: rep from *, end k2
Row 8:
Purl

Repeat rows 7-8 until work measures 160cm (approx 63inches), block work,  sew end seams together and weave in ends


Using larger needles means this infinity scarf is completed in next to no time and the eyelets give texture and interest - perfect for adding a bit of style to your Winter wardrobe.

Happy Knitting

Deb

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Sunday, 16 August 2015

Simple Oversized Cable Cowl

Pin It It's cold!  How cold I hear you ask?  Well, it's all relative.  The mornings are dropping to 3C (37.4F) which many of you would laugh at.  But, from where I am (Perth, Western Australia) it's about as cold as it gets and that can only mean one thing - knitting!

I have some gorgeous Araucania Tepa left over from my braided cowl which knits up beautifully.  It's thick, colourful and, most importantly, warm. 
Gorgeous colour blending

I wanted a cowl that is very 'high'.  That is, it can be squished down around the neck but pulled up past the ears and even over the head when times are tough and a bitter wind is blowing from the south (or east or west - wherever the bitter wind comes from where you are ..)





Pattern

Abbreviations:

K2tog - Knit 2 stitches together.  This creates a decrease that slants to the right.

Taking Shape
SSK - slip 2 stitches purlwise.  Place left hand side needle through the front of the stitches (the right hand side needle will be at the back ready to knit) and then knit the 2 stitches.  
This creates a decrease that slants to the left.


Using a set of circular 5.00mm knitting needles, cast on 176 stitches

Row 1: *P2, K4, P2, K6, P2, K6* rpt to end

Row 2:  As row 1

Row 3: *P2, K2tog, wrap yarn twice around the needle, SSK, P2, K6, P2, K6* rpt to end.

Row 4: *P2, K1, Knit into 1st wrap then  knit into 2nd wrap (to create 2 stitches), K1, P2, K6, P2, K6* rpt to end.

These 4 rows form the pattern for the cowl.

Continue until work measures the desired length - which in my case is 40cm long.

Cast off and prepare to be warm - very warm.

This cowl is very easy to knit and is one of those delightful patterns that comes together effortlessly in front of the television.

Happy Knitting,
Louise

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Sunday, 9 August 2015

Alpaca Neckwarmer

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I was very tempted to call this neckwarmer something like "Will Winter ever end Neckwarmer" or "That wind feels like it's straight off the Antarctic Neckwarmer" but instead I went for something far less connected with the current state of the weather here in Melbourne and decided on Alpaca because as expected it's made from 3 balls of Moda Vera Husky - a 100% baby alpaca yarn I purchased from Spotlight a couple of years ago.  It's a chunky 12 ply that's ideal for Winter knitting.







The stitch pattern is Diagonal Slip Stitch from Yarnsprations.

Neckwarmer Pattern:

Using 8mm (US size 11) needles and the chunky 12 ply yarn of your choice, cast on 41 stitches.

Continue Diagonal Slip Stitch pattern until work measures 72cm (approx 28 inches)

Cast off,


Block finished work.


Sew end seams together, leaving the last 8cm (approx 3inches) unsewn,  I did mine with the cast off row showing to provide texture and detail to the finished project.  I was very tempted to add wooden buttons to finish, but decided that it would be a little busy and that the slip stitch should be the star of the show.

Wear with the top edge rolled down slightly and enjoy having a lovely warm neck for months to come!

Happy knitting

Deb

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Sunday, 2 August 2015

Pickled Chillies

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I've been a fan of Rachel Khoo for a while now.  Who could resist the charm of Little Paris Kitchen and what could possibly be the world's smallest restaurant?  I was lucky enough to receive a copy of the cookbook at Christmas and have slowly been working my way through some of the classic French dishes it contains, not quite in a Julia & Julia kind of way, but in an every recipe works exactly as it should and my family have been enjoying some tasty French cuisine kind of way.

Fast forward to Mother's Day and I gleefully unwrapped some preserving jars and cookbooks.  I'm not big on commercialised gift giving days, but there was absolutely no complaints from me this year as I had visions of pots of fresh garden vegetables on the stove, slowly cooking away to transform into delicious pickles and sauces.

Sadly for me, things then got a bit hectic and between studying, working, crafting, blogging and doing all the parenting things there simply was no time.  The weeks turned into months and my preserving jars sat unused, while I wistfully researched what fruits and vegetables were in season and read recipes  - longing all the while to get started.

At the moment I'm on a little study break and this has coincided very nicely with Rachel Khoo's new Melbourne Kitchen Notebook which has just started airing recently and there in the very first episode was a recipe for Pickled Chillies.  It's easy, quick and perfect for the time poor cook who always seems to not have chillies  when they need them (that would be me!)


Rachel's recipe calls for an assortment of chillies and so I spent a lovely Sunday morning chopping away at the different varieties we'd picked up at the markets.  The recipe recommends wearing rubber gloves and I decided that it would probably be for the best,  I also made the decision to use a flimsy old chopping board that I don't generally use, just to make sure that the chilli then didn't seep into my good chopping boards and forever infuse everything we then made with an unwanted heat kick.


Once my jars were sterilised and my chillies chopped and rinsed, it was a simple case of adding the preserving liquid, sealing the lids and popping the jars in the fridge ready to use.

I'm busy planning my next venture into preserves and I can't wait.

Happy cooking 

Deb


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Sunday, 19 July 2015

Sari Ribbon Crochet Placemats

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I've been looking at Sari Ribbon online for a while, thinking I might use it for weaving, but knowing all the while that setting up the loom is quite time consuming and lately I haven't had much free time for anything, let alone fiddling about with warps and wefts.   So I delayed purchasing any until I found some at Feltfine for the bargain price of $8.50 per 100g - how could I resist!

Sari Ribbon is the byproduct of sari manufacturing and is colourful, uneven, frayed,  and you never know quite what you are gong to get.  In other words it's utterly wonderful to work with if, like me, you aren't looking for perfection in every project, but find joy in watching yarn transform and being excited by the journey that unfolds.

To find out just what the Sari Ribbon is like to work with, I've decided on some casual Summer placemats (even though it feels like Winter will never end here in Melbourne at the moment).

You will need:

Large Crochet Hook - I used a 12mm hook for this project.
Skeins of Sari Ribbon - I found that a 100g skein makes approximately one and a half placemats.
Stitch markers

Pattern.

Chain 2, Slip stitch into first chain to form circle

Round 1.

Chain 1. Work 10 single crochets (SC) into circle, slip stitch into first single crochet to join.

Round 2.

Chain 1, Work 2 SC into each stitch of previous round.  Slip Stitch to finish round.

Round 3.

Chain 1, Work 1 SC into same stitch as chain, *work 2 SC into next stitch, work one SC into next stitch* repeat from * to * until round finished.  Slip Stitch into initial stitch to finish round.


Round 4.

Chain 1. Work 1 SC into same stitch as chain, *1SC, 1SC, 2SC* into stitches of previous round repeat from * to * until finished. Slip Stitch to complete round.

Round 5.

Chain 1.  Work 1 SC into same stitch as chain.
*1SC, 1SC, 1SC, 2SC* Repeat * to * into stitches of previous round until finished.  Slip Stitch to complete round,




Round 6.

Chain 1. Work 1 SC into same stitch as chain. *1SC, 1SC, 1SC 1SC, 2SC* Repeat  *to* into stitches of previous round until finished.  Slip Stitch to complete round.

Round 7. Final Round

Chain 1.  Work 1SC into same stitch as chain.  *1SC, 1SC, 1SC, 1SC, 1SC, 2SC* Repeat *to* into stitches of previous round until finished.  Slip Stitch to complete placemat.  Weave in ends.


These textural and colourful placemats are a breeze to make and perfect for outdoor dining or a casual meal.  I've decided that it's not quite the medium I'm wanting for my next project - think I might have to try some recycled sari yarn for that one.

Happy Crocheting

Deb

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